Wedding Pictures, How to plan your day?

Published: 17th April 2012
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Your wedding photographer can either make or break or day, so be sure you choose one that not only takes fabulous photos, but listens to what you want. When planning your big day, be sure to factor in time for pictures both before and after the actual ceremony.

A typical wedding day photo schedule would look something like this: Pictures should start about one and a half to two hours before bride is leaving for the wedding. Your photographer should be taking lots of candid shots during this time. Some examples would be, the dress hanging by itself, both front and back, the jewelry, the shoes, the bride getting finishing touches done, pictures of the attendants helping or getting ready themselves. There should be some time set aside for the bride to get some more posed pictures with her wedding party, and her family and other important people who may be helping out. If there are children involved its important to get good shots of them early. More often than not, by later in the day, they have had enough of pictures and wont cooperate as well.

If there is a second photographer involved he/she should be doing the same type of shots with the groom and his groomsmen. If the wedding is more traditional (bride and groom wait to see each other on the alter) than the rest of the group photos should be taken after the ceremony. I like to have at least 30 minutes to an hour in the church after the ceremony to get some formal pictures. This could vary depending on how big your wedding party and families are. Its nice to get the family pictures done first, so they can go and enjoy the cocktail party or have some time to relax before the reception if there is a longer break.

If the reception is immediately following the wedding, your photographer should keep things moving along. Donít get bogged down waiting for any one person (except for the bride and groom) There is usually plenty of time during the reception to get some more group/family shots. If there is lots of time between the wedding and reception, your photographer can move at a more relaxed pace. If the weather is bad or the reception starts immediately, your photographer should find some more creative looks inside the church. Maybe from the balcony or in front of some stained glass.

Now that the church is done, its time to move on to the second location. I like the bride and groom to pick locations that are special to them. If pressed for time, finding a spot that has multiple looks in a small area is key. Maybe a park that has some grassy areas and also a lake. Its important to pick a location that has some shade. Those hot summer days can be brutal for a wedding party in tuxes and gowns. I encourage my couples to bring snacks and beverages for the pictures. Keeps everyone hydrated and happy and they will last a little longer.

After the formal shots are finished, its time to party. Its important to have your photographer get close up shots of all the details that you have spent so much time working on. The cake, the place cards, gift table, center pieces, the head table, the overall view of the room when its empty. These are great shots to have because chance are, you wont get a chance to really appreciate them on your wedding day. Candid shots are great to get at the reception, because everyone is starting to loosen up and have some fun. There are a few shots that your photographer should not miss, such as, introductions, first dances, cake cutting and any toasts that are made.

Your photographer should be able to work with any time frame that you give them, but keep in mind you might enjoy the whole process more if there is a little time to relax and have some fun with the pictures. Your wedding should be a fabulous memory, so choosing a photographer that can help you capture those special moments is important. Itís just as important to choose a photographer that interacts well with you and your family and friends. Happy people make for great photos!!


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